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The basic way to make Swedish snus at lower temperature and longer time

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  • The basic way to make Swedish snus at lower temperature and longer time

    After many years of making snus at 90ºC (194ºF), I decided to go back to the original method I
    used when I started to use the slow cooker. From what I remember and what I have read on different
    forums, lower temperature and longer time make snus less bitter and richer in flavor.
    After many years of making snus at 90ºC (194ºF), I decided to go back to the original method I used when I started to use the slow cooker. From what I remember and what I have read on different forums, lower temperature and longer time make snus less bitter and richer in flavor.

  • #2
    Hi BasseBlues I have a question about adding sodium bicarbonate before cooking. I noticed you did that in one of your vids. Is there still a need for a second cook in that case? I was under the impression that the second cook was needed to alkalise the snus after the first cook when the bicarbonate is usually added. So my question is, does adding the bicarb before the first cook eliminate the nerd to cook/bake a second time?

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    • #3
      Hello Naswari
      The answer is that I really don't know. I have tried adding the sodium from the start, after half the cooking time, and after the cooking. I can't tell if the taste is any different, but the smell during cooking is stronger with the sodium added from the start. There are many recipes out there that use one of the three methods. But when I cook for a longer time, I can start using the snus from day one.

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      • #4
        So if you add it from the start do you still have to cook it twice, i.e take it out of the slow cooker, mix it and then put it back for a second time, or do you just cook it once?

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        • #5
          I used to do that before I started using a roasting bag. Without a bag, the snus near the pot dries out so you have to mix it once a day. But with a roasting bag, I leave it in for 7 days without touching it for the whole time. The bag keeps moist in and the snus doesn't dry out during the cooking.

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          • #6
            OK thanks for your feedback BasseBlues, I liked your insulation method, you said it reduces the time by a whole lot. I think most home Snus makers are using the pressure cooker method now?

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            • #7
              Yes, pressure cookers are the new thing in the snus community. But for my last 3 batches, I have gone back to cook it without the insulation. I cook at 65-70ºC for 7 days and I would say that the taste is better than when I'm using the insulation. But with some planning, I don't need to have snus ready in 4 hours, I can wait for 7 days.

              I have never used a pressure cooker, so I can't say if the taste differs from my method with the Crock-pot.

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              • #8
                I have tried to shortcut time using pressure cookers many many times and everytime the snus tastes much more sharp and bitter. I don't think there's a shortcut for time that doesn't compromise quality.
                Squeezyjohn

                Sometimes wrong and sometimes right .... but ALWAYS certain!!!

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